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Carnarvon Primary School

Work hard, be kind

Carnarvon Primary School

Religious Education

The intent of our Religious Education Curriculum is to:

  • Enable each pupil to explore our shared human experience and the questions of meaning and purpose which arise from our experiences.
  • Enable pupils to acquire and develop knowledge and understanding of Christianity and other principal religions of the United Kingdom.
  • Promote respect, sensitivity and cultural awareness by teaching about religions represented in our community and help develop an understanding of cultural diversity, promoting social cohesion.
  • Provide pupils with opportunities for spiritual, moral, social and cultural development.
  • Enable children to grow in their awareness of themselves and their similarities and differences in relation to others.
  • Develop a child’s own sense of worth and the worth of others in the community.
  • Develop the ability of pupils to think about, and develop for themselves, beliefs and values by which they can live including a clear sense of what is right and wrong.

The implementation of our RE Curriculum:

Our religious education curriculum is in the form of Love to Celebrate projects, which deliver the programme of study from our local Standing Advisory Council on Religious Education (SACRE). The skills statements are taken from A Curriculum Framework for Religious Education in England, published by the Religious Education Council of England and Wales.

 

Each year group studies six projects that cover the major religions of Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism and Sikhism. The projects are based around festivals or celebrations and where possible, are planned in the academic terms closest to these festivals.

 

Buddhism

Children begin their study of Buddhism with the Year 1 summer project, Esala Perahera. They learn about Buddha, the sacred tooth relic and how Buddhists seek blessings for a good harvest during this festival. They also explore the theme of memories and remembering.

 

In the Year 2 summer project, Losar, the children further their knowledge of Buddhist festivals by learning about the Tibetan New Year and exploring the themes of thankfulness and the future.

 

In the Year 3 spring project, Vesak, the children build on their knowledge of Buddha by studying Buddha Day, which commemorates the birth, enlightenment and death of Buddha. They also explore the theme of kindness.

 

In the Year 4 autumn project, Kathina, the children develop their knowledge about the Buddhist way of life by studying the largest alms-giving ceremony in the Buddhist year. They learn about the life of a Buddhist monk and the Rains Retreat before exploring the theme of generosity.

 

In the Year 5 autumn project, Dharma Day, the children focus on Buddha’s first sermon in India. They study the Wheel of Dharma, the Middle Way and Buddha’s teachings before exploring the theme of compassion.

 

To complete their study of Buddhism, in the Year 6 summer project, Parinirvana, the children learn more about Buddha’s death and passing into Nirvana. They study karma and explore different faiths’ beliefs about life after death.

 

Christianity

Children begin their study of Christianity with the Year 1 autumn project, Harvest. They learn how Christians give thanks for food during this festival and explore the theme of sharing.

 

In the Year 2 autumn project, Christmas, the children learn about Advent and the birth of Jesus Christ. They also explore the theme of joy.

 

In the Year 3 spring project, Lent, the children expand their knowledge of Jesus Christ by studying the time when he spent 40 days fasting in the desert. They also explore the theme of prayer.

 

In the Year 4 spring project, Holy Week and Easter, the children further develop their knowledge of Jesus Christ by studying his death and resurrection. They also explore the theme of belief.

 

In the Year 5 summer project, Pentecost, the children build on their knowledge of Holy Week by studying what followed: the Ascension of Jesus Christ and the descent of the Holy Spirit. They also explore the theme of community.

 

To complete their study of Christianity, in the Year 6 summer project, Sunday, the children learn more about how Christians worship in church. They explore the theme of faith and compare worship in different religions.

 

Hinduism

Children begin their study of Hinduism with the Year 1 autumn project, Diwali. They learn the story of Rama and Sita and how the festival celebrates new beginnings. They also explore the theme of luck.

 

In the Year 2 summer project, Navratri, the children learn how Hindus worship a different form of the mother goddess Durga every day for nine nights and ten days to give thanks for the harvest. The children also explore the theme of celebrations.

 

In the Year 3 autumn project, Ganesh Chaturthi, the children learn about the Hindu god, Ganesh. They also explore the theme of overcoming obstacles.

 

In the Year 4 autumn project, Janmashtami, the children expand their knowledge of Hindu gods by learning about Krishna. They also explore the theme of role models.

 

In the Year 5 spring project, Holi, the children develop their knowledge of Krisha by learning the story of Krishna and Radha. The children also explore the themes of want and need.

 

To complete their study of Hinduism, in the Year 6 spring project, Kumbh Mela, the children develop their knowledge of Hindu celebrations by studying the pilgrimages to Hindu sacred sites. They also explore the theme of devotion.

 

Islam

Children begin their study of Islam with the Year 1 spring project, Milad un Nabi. They learn about the Prophet Muhammad and explore the theme of leadership.

 

In the Year 2 spring project, Jumu’ah, the children learn about Muslims’ Friday prayers. They also explore the theme of worship and investigate the places of worship used by different faiths.

 

In the Year 3 summer project, Hajj, the children develop their knowledge of Muslim practices by studying the Five Pillars of Islam, particularly the pilgrimage to the holy city of Mecca. They also explore the theme of journeys.

 

In the Year 4 summer project, Eid ul-Adha, the children build on their knowledge of Hajj by studying the festival that takes place at the end of the pilgrimage. This festival celebrates the Prophet Ibrahim’s willingness to sacrifice his son when Allah ordered him to. The children also explore the theme of charity. This project links to the art and design project, Islamic Art.

 

In the Year 5 summer project, Ramadan and Eid al-Fitr, the children continue to build on their knowledge of Muslim festivals by studying how Muslims fast during the holy month of Ramadan. They add to this by learning about Eid al-Fitr, which is celebrated at the end of Ramadan. The children also explore the theme of gratitude.

 

To complete their study of Islam, in the Year 6 spring project, Lailat al Miraj, the children build on their knowledge of the Prophet Muhammad by studying his Night Journey, where he ascended into heaven and journeyed back to Mecca. The children also explore the theme of faith.

 

Judaism

Children begin their study of Judaism with the Year 1 spring project, Purim. The children learn about Queen Esther and how she prevented her husband’s servant from killing the Jewish people. They find out how Jews commemorate the event and then explore the theme of giving and receiving gifts.

 

In the Year 2 spring project, Hanukkah, the children build on their knowledge of Jewish history by learning about the victory of Judah Maccabee over the Syrian emperor and the miracle of the lamp. They also explore the theme of miracles.

 

In the Year 3 summer project, Shavuot, the children learn about the festival that celebrates the gift of the Torah and the harvest. They also explore the theme of rules.

 

In the Year 4 summer project, Shabbat, the children learn about the Jewish day of rest, which lasts from sunset on Friday to sunset on Saturday. They also explore the theme of rest.

 

In the Year 5 spring project, Passover, the children learn more about the Shavuot festival by studying what comes before it: the festival celebrating the time Moses led the Israelites to freedom. They also explore the themes of freedom and human rights.

 

To complete their study of Judaism, in the Year 6 autumn project, Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, the children learn about two more festivals where Jewish people look forward to the New Year and reflect on the past year, putting right any wrongs. They also explore the theme of forgiveness.

 

Sikhism

Children begin their study of Sikhism with the Year 1 summer project, Naam Karan. The children learn about a baby naming ceremony held in a Gurdwara and the Sikh holy book, the Guru Granth Sahib. They also explore the theme of family.

 

In the Year 2 autumn project, Anand Karaj, the children build on their knowledge of Sikh ceremonies by studying the Sikh wedding ceremony and exploring the theme of love.

 

In the Year 3 autumn project, Guru Nanak Gurpurab, the children learn about Guru Nanak, the founder of the Sikh religion. They also explore the themes of equality and fairness.

 

In the Year 4 spring project, Vaisakhi, the children learn about the creation of ordained Sikhs called the Khalsa and the Five Ks of Sikhism. They also explore the theme of identity.

 

In the Year 5 autumn project, Guru Arjan Gurpurab, the children build on their knowledge of Sikh Gurus by studying the life of Guru Arjan, who achieved many things during his lifetime and is celebrated with special services at the Gurdwara. They also explore the theme of words.

 

To complete their study of Sikhism, in the Year 6 autumn project, Bandi Chhor Divas, the children continue to expand their knowledge of Sikh Gurus by studying Guru Hargobind’s life. They also explore the theme of defence.

The intended impact of our RE Curriculum is that:

By the end of KS2, all pupils will have a developed knowledge and understanding of Christianity and other principle religions of the United Kingdom. They will be able to demonstrate respect, sensitivity and cultural awareness towards other faiths and have an understanding of cultural diversity within their own and nearby communities. Pupils will have an awareness of their own spiritual, moral, social and cultural preferences and a developed sense of their own worth and the worth of others in the community. They will be able to think about and develop for themselves beliefs and values by which they can live including a clear sense of what is right and wrong.

Dydd Gwyl Dewi Hapus - Happy St David's Day to everyone. Welcome to Carnarvon Primary School's website. Information about events taking place can be found on the calendar under 'Parents' tab. Thank you.
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